Change or end a standard representation agreement

Myth or fact?

My daughter told me she no longer wants me to be her representative. But I've cared for her all her life. I don't have to listen to her.
  • Myth
  • Fact

With a standard representation agreement, you can name someone to make certain decisions for you. Learn about your rights and options for changing or ending one. 

What you should know

You can make changes to a standard representation agreement

You can adjust your agreement, so long as you’re still capable of making a standard representation agreement.

Tip

Usually, if you sign a legal document, you have to be capable of understanding the nature and consequences of what you’re agreeing to. The law sets a different threshold of capability for making a standard representation agreement. Learn more about this different threshold on our page preparing a standard representation agreement.

Say you want to give your representative more, or less, power. You can’t simply write your changes into the document. There are certain rules you must follow. Any legal change (called an amendment) must be signed in a certain way. 

An alternative to amending your agreement is to revoke (end) it. You can then make a new representation agreement that reflects the desired changes.

You can revoke (end) a standard representation agreement

“I have a developmental disability. I asked my brother Jas to be my representative last year, but it’s not working for me. Jas is so bossy. He thinks he can take over my life. I told my friends and family about my problem. They’re going to help me end my old agreement with Jas. I’ll make a new one with my friend Annie. She really listens to what I have to say.”

– Sanita, New Westminster

You can get out of your agreement at any time. But at the time you revoke it, you must be capable of making a standard representation agreement.

You must put your decision in writing in a notice of revocation. You must give a signed and dated copy of the notice of revocation to:

  • each representative,

  • each alternate representative, and

  • your monitor, if you have one.

If your representative wants to quit

If your representative wants to resign, they must say so in writing. The written decision is called a notice of resignation

They must give the written notice of resignation to:

  • you (as the person who appointed them),

  • any other representatives named in the standard representation agreement,

  • any alternate representatives, and

  • your monitor, if you have one.

You should notify anyone who knew who your representative was (such as your bank, doctor, or care home) of the resignation. You can ask someone close to you for help, if you need it.

Nidus Personal Planning Resource Centre and Registry provides detailed information on resigning as an representative. It includes a sample notice of resignation. 

Change the agreement

Step 1. Put your decision in writing

If you want to make changes to your existing standard representation agreement, there are certain rules you must follow. 

The change must be in writing. A formal change to a legal document is called an amendment. This is a separate document that sets out the changes to be made. It should refer to the original representation agreement.

The law says the amendment must be signed in a certain way:

  • You must sign and date it in front of two witnesses.

  • The witnesses must sign and date the agreement in front of you. Note that you only need one witness if they’re a notary public or a lawyer.  

  • Your representative (including any alternates) must sign the amendment. If you have more than one representative, each must sign the amendment before they can act under it. But your representatives don’t all have to sign at the same time. And their signatures don’t need to be witnessed.

  • If you have a monitor, they must complete and sign a monitor’s certificate. If you don’t have a monitor, but are adding a financial authority to your representation agreement, you might have to appoint monitor.

  • Any other certificates that needed to be signed when you made the agreement would have to be re-signed. You can find what these certificates are by looking at your existing agreement — the certificates should be attached to it.

A person can’t witness a signature if they are:

  • a representative,

  • an alternate representative,

  • a spouse, child, or parent of the representative or alternate, or

  • employed by the representative, unless you’re appointing a lawyer, notary public or the Public Guardian and Trustee as your representative.

Tip

Consider asking a lawyer or notary to draft the amendment for you. This will help ensure that your representation agreement (as amended) continues to be valid. 

Step 2. Give a copy of the notice to your representative(s)

It’s a good idea to give written notice of the amendment to each representative, alternate representative and monitor. Attach a copy of the amendment to the notice.

If you want to be sure the notice makes it to the recipient, send it by registered mail.

Step 3. Give a copy of the notice to anyone else you gave a copy of your agreement

You should also notify anyone you gave a copy of your representation agreement to, or anyone who might have expected to deal with your representative (such as your bank, doctor, or care home), that you changed the agreement.

End the agreement

Step 1. Put your decision in writing

This written document is called a notice of revocation. You can use wording like this:

I,__________________ [your name], revoke the standard representation agreement that I made on ___________ [date standard representation agreement was signed] that appointed the following people ________________[name of your representative(s)] as my representative. Date: _____________________ Signature: _________________

Be sure to sign and date the notice of revocation.

The revocation takes effect when the notice is given to everyone required. Or you can specify (in the notice of revocation) a date in the future when it will take effect. 

Step 2. Give a copy of the notice to your representative(s)

Give a signed and dated copy of the notice of revocation to each of your representatives, alternate representatives and your monitor (if you have one).

If you want to be sure the notice makes it to the recipient, send it by registered mail.

Step 3. Give a copy of the notice to anyone else you gave a copy of your agreement

You should also notify anyone you gave a copy of your representation agreement to, or anyone who might have expected to deal with your representative (such as your bank, doctor, or care home), that you ended the agreement.

Step 4. If you make a new agreement, refer to your old agreement

If you make a new agreement, you should say in it that you have revoked your old agreement. Include the date when the old agreement was originally signed, and when it was revoked.

Common questions

My representative has a new address. Do I need to prepare a new standard representation agreement?

No, you don’t have to prepare a new agreement every time a representative’s address, phone number or legal name changes.

On a separate piece of paper, note the change. For example, if your representative has moved, write down their name and new address. Attach this to your original representation agreement (use a paperclip, not a staple). Also, attach any proof of the change, such as a copy of a legal name change document.

Don’t make any changes to the original document — this may make it invalid.

I want someone else to act as my representative. Should I end my existing standard representation agreement?

If you want to change who your representative is, it’s always open to you to end your existing agreement and make a new one (as long as you’re capable of doing so). But there are other options, depending on the circumstances.

If you only have one representative and:

  • You have an alternate named in your representation agreement, your representative can resign and your alternate can step in. Your alternate continues to act under your existing agreement.

  • You don't have an alternate, you'll need to end your agreement. You can then prepare a new agreement appointment the person you want as representative.

If you have multiple representatives, check to see what your agreement says. For example, if your representatives can make decisions independently, you may be able to ask one representative to resign, so that the other representatives can continue to act. 

If you’re not sure what to do, consider seeking legal advice.

Who can help

Helpful agencies

The Alzheimer Society of BC provides information and support to families, individuals, and caregivers to alleviate the personal and social consequences of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. 

Visit website

Nidus Personal Planning Resource Centre and Registry provides detailed information and answers questions about representation agreements and other planning documents. 

Email info@nidus.ca Visit website

The Public Guardian and Trustee of BC is a public body that can investigate the misuse of a standard representation agreement. It also provides financial management and legal decision-making for vulnerable adults.

Call 604-660-4444 Visit website

  • Reviewed in June 2019
  • This information applies to British Columbia, Canada
  • Time to read: 7 minutes

Reviewed for legal accuracy by

Kevin Smith, Retired lawyer and consultant

Kevin Smith

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